My Hitchcockian homage to Vertigo and that famous Grey Suit

I was pretty excited when I got commissioned this iconic grey suit, originally designed by the formidable Edith Head and worn by Kim Novak in the equally classic and one of my favourite Hitchcock films, Vertigo (1958)

I knew it was going to be quite a challenge to make it justice but here I present my little homage.

In beautiful thin striped grey Italian wool, it has wide lapels, fabric covered buttons, two decorative pockets (I’m not quite sure if the original Edith Head design had actual functional pockets)but I decided to go for these, just for the line of the suit jacket. The jacket itself is slightly form fitting with the added darts. The sleeves have small rounded cuffs. The skirt is calf length, with a central back slit and it fastens with a zipper at the side seam.

 

 

 

 

1950s Suzie Parker style swing coat

This beautiful mid-1950s style swing coat, also known as the Suzie Parker coat in yellow mohair is definitely a stand out piece and very typical of the era.

With it’s stand up collar and wide sleeves with equally wide cuffs and the curious arrow shaped embedded pockets and the distinguished trapeze shape will no doubt turn a few heads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1950s style silk satin and chiffon cocktail dress

This lovely turquoise 1950s style cocktail dress in silk chiffon and silk satin has it’s distinct silhouette of the era, with the full skirt, 3/4 length sleeves and the fitted bodice ruched at shoulders with a v- neckline both front and back and giving it a nice little touch are the asymmetrically placed lace floral motifs on the wide cummerbund and the right shoulder. Fastens with a zipper at the back.

Worn here by the lovely Sarah.

 

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Nettie revamped

This plaid linen and cream cotton darling is the little sister to the original Nettie dress. Also cut on bias gives it a beautiful silhouette very typical of the 1930s. It features an original vintage 1930s button and buckle.

 

Nettie- the early 1930s darling

This dress was originally going to be part of my 2014 “The 1930s bow dress collection”, which didn’t make it at the time, but I’m now adding as a latecomer to the party, in this case minus the bow. And as I always wanted to use this particular original vintage plaid cotton fabric, here is the result;

Cut on bias, with panelling, instantly forming the very popular zig-zag motif of the era, contrasting with the geometric art deco style front panel peaking towards the waist and adorned with a bakelite button, with a slight cowl neckline. Also with a similar v forming at the back. Complemented by a belt with bakelite buckle. With snap fasteners at the side.This sweet little dress would have been perfect at a summer gathering in the early 1930s.

 

A little something I made for myself

Sometimes you get the time to treat yourself and here’s the result; this sweet early 1930s inspired dress in seersucker cotton has that vibe of the feedsack fabric dresses of the Prohibition era. A very big favourite of the era, cutting fabrics on bias, in this case a stripey one (if they weren’t already printed diagonally) creating the diamond effect, both at the front and the back. The contrasting square collar in navy cotton has the fun, tie like finish and with beautiful diamond shape burgundy bakelite art deco buttons. Fastens with snap fasteners at the side.

Interview With Irma of The Vintage Dressmaker

Interviewed by the lovely Emily from The Pretty and The Kitsch

The Pretty and The Kitsch

Today I am thrilled to be interviewing the lovely Irma of The Vintage Dressmaker. Irma is an extremely talented seamstress and her 1930’s and 1940’s inspired dresses are absolutely amazing. It was so much fun getting to know her and learn more about her work!

I hope you all enjoy this interview, and that you make sure to check out Irma’s beautiful dresses!

Tell us about your business, The Vintage Dressmaker!

I’m a self-employed dressmaker and designer specializing in 1920-1950s style womenswear. I work mainly with private clients but have also made dresses for shops and costume houses. I guess I’m what you could call an all-in-one as I design, draw patterns, source fabrics and trimmings and make the dresses. Though more challenging it is also the most satisfying thing about my business as I’m part of the whole process and as such, in control of all aspects of…

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